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RaceDeck Diamond Plate Cheap Design Sale SALE% OFF Modular Interlocking Gara Durable

RaceDeck Diamond Plate Design, Durable Interlocking Modular Gara

$35

RaceDeck Diamond Plate Design, Durable Interlocking Modular Gara

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Product description

Product Description

All tiles ship in a 2' x 2' sheet and each sheet contains four 12" x 12" tiles. This 12 pack ships in a box of three sheets (four tiles in each sheet).

From the Manufacturer

The patented RaceDeck Diamond is the one that started the modular garage flooring industry that you see today, and continues to be the best-selling garage flooring system on the planet. Offered in six different styles of garage flooring tiles, 10 standard colors, and limitless custom color options; RaceDeck Floors are great for garages, basements, porches, patios, and more. Installing RaceDeck requires no glues or chemicals, messes or toxic fumes, and each module simply ‘snaps’ into place!

The full-suspension, modular design is engineered to create a custom garage floor at virtually any size that that can handle extreme loads while the substructure is channeled to allow air and moisture to circulate freely underneath preventing odor-causing mold and mildew. Our patented substructure will handle vehicle rolling loads in excess of 80,000 pounds without any damage to the floor. Whether you have heavy tool chests, 4-post lifts, or just your prized ride, RaceDeck will handle it all. Durable, easy to clean, 15 Year Manufacturer’s Warranty. No tools necessary. Made in the USA.

Tiles are 12”x12”x0.5”. This is the 12 pack. Also available in single tiles, 24 packs and 48 packs.


From the manufacturer

Home Garage

RaceDeck is the best choice for your home garage. It’s easy to install and designed to cover unsightly cracks or flaking in your current floor. With a variety of colors available, you can create a custom look for your garage that is slip-resistant and won't peel or chip. Easy to clean and resistant to common garage chemicals, our RaceDeck products carry a 20-year warranty that gives you confidence that we stand behind the product we build.

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Trade Show amp; Mobile Display

Set up and break down are a snap! No tools are required, cutting time and labor costs. Make your booth stand out with a variety of colors and styles to customize to your trade show or mobile flooring. Our lightweight, 12" x 12" panels breakdown and store easily in between shows.

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Shop Flooring

Tough! This flooring was designed to withstand the elements of a working garage. RaceDeck can handle floor jacks, lifts and heavy vehicles. It is resistant to gas, oil, salt and other chemicals. The anti-fatigue qualities in our floor help protect your employees, while the shock absorbing understructure protects your tools. Make your floor stand out from the other guys.

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Retail Display

Catch your customers' eye with a unique point of purchase display floor. You can customize your store with a variety of colors and patterns. RaceDeck is easy to install, easy to move, easy to clean.

RaceDeck Diamond CircleTrac Free-Flow GarageTrac GarageDeck
Key Features Patented interlocking system, patented structural design - built tough to support extreme rolling loads, easy to clean, USA made Classic look, patented structural design - built tough to support extreme rolling loads, easy to clean, USA made Patented self-draining surface, offers superior traction in garage environment, USA made USA made, affordable garage flooring, patented design, slip-resistant Slip-resistant, coin top transforms the look of your garage in hours, not days, USA made
Best Used For Commercial or residential applications Commercial or residential applications Wet/muddy conditions Residential Residential
Dimensions (Single Tile) 12" x 12" x 0.5" 12" x 12" x 0.5" 12" x 12" x 0.5" 12" x 12" x 0.5" 12" x 12" x 0.5"

RaceDeck Diamond Plate Design, Durable Interlocking Modular Gara

"Welcome!"

Welcome! Our lab explores how the environment that organisms experience shapes their ecological, behavioral, evolutionary, and conservation trajectories. We focus our research on animal and plant and plant systems around the world, with active studies on plant-animal interactions, mating systems, demography and survival, signal evolution, movement and dispersal, and endangered species. Our lab takes a socially aware approach that combines community-engaged participatory research with capacity building, training, and education in the biodiversity hotspots where we work.

Spring 2021

Posted by on Jun 8, 2021 in Uncategorized | Comments Off on Spring 2021

As the weather warms, we come to the end of an academic year unlike any other. While the meetings remained virtual, the promise of a return to normalcy as more and more people get vaccinated kept spirits bright. We are happy to see each other again in person and enjoy the beautiful scenery that a New Orleans spring brings. We also have so much to celebrate!

Congratulations to our fresh PhD candidates Annelise Blanchette and Mike Ellis for successfully defending their prospectus’ and to Caroline Camus, Erin Sheehy, and Melanie Smith for successfully defending their undergraduate Honors Theses! Great job everyone!

We have many graduating students to celebrate too! Congratulations to Plus One MS student Peyton Fralick for finishing his program. Additional cheers for our graduating seniors Caroline Camus, Erin Sheehy, and Melanie Smith.

A huge congratulations to Sarah Khalil who was recently awarded the NSF Postdoc Fellowship!

The PhD students have a lot to look forward to after a whirlwind of an academic year.

John Jones finally learned to work from home and wrote two chapters of his dissertation; one chapter is currently in review and the other will be submitted shortly. In addition, John has received funding from the American Physiological Societies’ “Lewis and Clark” grant to support another trip to Papua New Guinea which will take place when it is globally safe to travel. In the meantime, he has repurposed the research on red-backed fairywrens conducted as part of his Australian Endeavor Fellowship to take center stage of his third chapter, exploring coloration in the sister species to his New Guinean songbirds. Finally, alongside another Karubian PhD student (no spoilers here!), John received the EEB department’s ‘Stephen Darwin Outstanding Teaching Assistant Award’ for his role in teaching Ecology and Experimental Animal Behavior for the 20-21 academic year.

Sarah Khalil has several updates: She has received an NSF postdoctoral fellowship in biology (PRFB), and will be starting at a postdoc in Dr. Irby Lovette’s lab at Cornell University in March 2022! She plans to defend her dissertation around November 2021. She also recently received the American Museum of Natural History Chapman Research Grant to fund her ongoing dissertation work. And on more personal news, she adopted a puppy named Frankie in January, and has been enjoying spending lots of time with him at home while she mainly works on analysis and writing.

Kaushik Narasimhan had a busy spring! At the beginning of the semester, he went to Ecuador to get the ball rolling on his 3rd chapter. After some twist and turns, he was able to collect seeds, get his shadehouse built, sterilize soil, and get his precious seeds germinating! Using plant tissue gathered during that field season, Kaushik was extracting DNA to conduct ddRAD protocols and further analysis. He is also getting ready to submit his 1st chapter for publication and another publication he co-authored was accepted for publication. Now that his seeds have germinated, Kaushik is back in Ecuador to plant his seeds to finish the setup for the experiment. When he returns over the summer, Kaushik is going to focus on ramping up a larger project in Ecuador beginning in the fall, focused on more plant species!

Annelise Blanchette successfully defended her prospectus and was awarded the EEB department’s ‘Bruce Fleury Outstanding Teaching Assistant Award’ for her role in teaching Diversity of Life during the 20-21 academic year. She also continued collaboration with local printmaker Pippin Frisbie-Calder and producer Zaferhan Yumru to create an educational video about the Mockingbird Project outreach. She finally submitted her master’s thesis manuscript to a journal and is waiting to hear back on that. She’s currently attempting to build a balance beam and treadmill for the brown anoles and will spend her summer collecting at much data as she can!

Mike Ellis added new remote sensing projects to his dissertation, successfully defended his prospectus, and was awarded a Lewis & Clark grant. After having his field work postponed all year due to the pandemic, he’s very excited to head to Ecuador and begin his Fulbright fellowship.

Luke Anderson spent several weeks in Ecuador learning to track white-bearded manakins using radio telemetry. Over the summer, he and other lab members will be embarking on an ambitious field study to determine relationships between fruit distributions and manakin space use, seed dispersal, and display behavior. He also recently published a paper in Animal Behaviour demonstrating that female cowbirds use chatter vocalizations to signal-jam male songs during courtship.

Last but not least, Jordan has had a busy semester full of reasons to celebrate!

Jordan Karubian received a Fulbright Fellowship for research and education work in Ecuador. He also received awards from the NSF for research on the factors that regulate abundance of palm trees in South America with Paul Fineand YANGAILIAN 2pcs ABS Chrome Upper Rear Door Window Hinge Cover Tr, and for research on plant-soil feedbacks with Tulane colleague and grant PI Sunshine Van Bael. He will be promoted to full Professor starting in July 2021 and is looking forward to spending some time in nature with his family this summer!

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Fall 2020

Posted by on Nov 30, 2020 in Uncategorized | Comments Off on Fall 2020

The fall semester welcomed students back to campus to teach and learn virtually and in-person!

We welcomed M.S. students Peyton Fralick, Tanner Mazanec, and Ace Spitzer. Undergraduate student Cecilia Hammond has joined the lab, Sarah Uher has moved from lab tech to researcher, and students Ellie Casement, Caroline Camus, Melanie Smith and Erin Sheehy are all making great progress on their honors theses.

As we navigated a whirlwind of a spring semester and summer, the returning PhD students have been productive.

John Jones had a busy summer watching hours upon hours of bird videos and learning how to analyze birdsongs to compare acoustic complexity between two populations of white-shouldered fairywrens. The song results are complete and are now added to the first chapter of his dissertation that he hopes to submit by the end of the year. This fall has been spent juggling teaching, writing this manuscript, writing grants, and washing his hands.

Sarah Khalil had her first chapter published in Proceedings of the Royal Society: B on how testosterone regulated CYP2J19 expression in red-backed fairywrens to produce red plumage. She presented some of her new whole-genome resequencing work describing the genetic basis of red coloration in hybrid fairywrens at the virtual North American Ornithological Conference in August. She was also invited to give a virtual seminar talk at Kenessaw State University in October, and very much enjoyed connecting with the students and faculty there and discussing her PhD work. Sarah is spending most of her time at home analyzing and writing up her other chapters.

Kaushik Narasimhan successfully defended his thesis prospectus and has advanced to candidacy. He also submitted his manuscript about a range extension for the long-tailed weasel in Ecuador and is putting the final touches on the manuscript for the first chapter of his dissertation. He is excited to head to Ecuador to start field research at the FCAT station!

Annelise Blanchette performed some field work over the summer to band nestling mockingbirds in the neighborhood surrounding Tulane. She also worked on a manuscript from her master’s on the antipredator behavior of the green and black poison frog in Costa Rica and intends to submit it for review by the holiday season. Additionally, she decided to include the Anolis lizards in her dissertation and named Dr. Alex Gunderson a co-advisor to complement Jordan’s skills and knowledge. She has continued collaborating with local printmaker Pippin Frisbie-Calder on The Mockingbird Project to create a unique and educational experience for a virtual Mardi Gras 2021!

Mike Ellis started a manuscript exploring how fragmentation may be causing humid forest bird communities to transition into semi-humid forest bird communities. He also began a new remote sensing project with the American Bird Conservancy examining the effects of low impact forestry on biodiversity in northwestern Ecuador. He’ll continue these projects through the fall semester before heading to Ecuador in January to begin his Fulbright Fellowship. He also recently had a paper coauthored with former lab member Rachel Cook and others accepted for publication in the Journal of Landscape Ecology.

Luke Anderson spent the last few weeks of the semester in Ecuador at the FCAT station chasing manakins. He has been learning a tremendous amount about their basic biology and honing his mist netting and behavioral observation skills. He also finished an article on behavior away from the lek in long-wattled umbrellabirds and has submitted it for review – fingers crossed!

Jordan Karubian has been keeping busy during Fall 2020, the Semester Like No Other. He has had a few papers come out, including Sarah Khalil’s first thesis chapter on production of the eponymous red plumage on the back of male red-backed fairy-wrens, former MS student Rachel Cook’s paper on diversity of mammals and terrestrial birds in forest fragments (with Mike Ellis and lab alums Tadeo Ramirez and Luke Browne), and former honors thesis student Tadeo Ramirez’s paper on the phenology of the Chapil palm Oenocarpus bataua in Ecuador. He has also put a lot of energy into the conservation work of FCAT, which has recently expanded its reserve size from 164 ha to 550 ha and is starting an ambitious experimental reforestation project – we are looking for passionate and committed young biologists and conservationists to come and join us, so it that sounds like you, reach out!

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